Archive for April, 2013

Thoughts leading to milk tap

Wednesday, April 17th, 2013

The coffee scene in Portland shifted in 1999, or really 1996 (or thereabouts), when a beloved Portland coffee roaster sold out, but so quietly that no one realized. After 96′ the spirit changed forever, but so did our focus.

Courier Coffee started with the desire to be local, hands on, and really many things that the future is not. One huge thing that set us apart, aside from transportation, was that our coffee bags were made of entirely paper, from Canada and Washington Pulp mills, not a deceptive plastic lined natural looking paper that many Portland roasters use today( why use plastic?). We also use glass mason jars for wholebean delivery (made in the U.S.A. and no not USA China). And we do take the jars back and reuse them for many more times to come. Then when we opened our bar We, along with Public Domaine, were one of the first to source compostable paper cups made in the USA from entirely USA material (genetically modified plant based lining- Monsanto, but still). The good news is that we are now not alone in this, and that others are joining in using the more expensive compostable cup.

The cost of glass is pretty enormous, as are paper to go cups. Surprisingly paper coffee bags are really almost the same price as poly-lined. Delivery fees are also pretty high, since honestly it takes more time to bike the city than to drive, yet we do not charge more than others.

This summer we think that putting milk on tap officially, will save the energy it takes opening and closing our refrigerator, which we hope will outweigh other environmental burdens, such as increased water usage and Argon use. It is constantly on our minds, reducing our energy footprint, and sourcing products from ecologically thoughtful sources (like our new eggs in the Canele!!!).

we are noticing

Sunday, April 7th, 2013

increased moisture content below ground, More dramatic humidity swings from dawn to dusk, small spring flies, reduced coffee batch sizes for greater thermal control during roast.

We have finally made contact directly with Jarden corporation, who owns Kerr, who purchased Ball long ago. We have also made contact with Tri-S (tualitan!!), the same printing company that puts the images on growlers of beer around town and 22′s like Rogue. We would like to make some Courier Coffee mason jar prints. This week we talk to Tri-S more about cost, but the talks with Jarden are going well. We would have images baked onto wide mouth and quart mason jars… The good news with the jars is that they are one of the few things still manufactured in the US. We are most certainly on track to have 1000- 2000 mason jars on a truck from the East coast in the next two weeks.

We are still thinking about the physical taps for milk on the bar, and finding someone to customize them. The Argon pressurizing the 5 gallon kegs has gone very well. We almost have a cleaning schedule on track, but more will depend on the tap lines in the coming weeks. All of this builds toward streamlining the bar for the summer. It has been very busy late winter and pre-spring, and we would like to keep moving.

At our bar the property owners are re-doing the tile in front of all the entry ways soon (within the next month we hear), this will cause a brief upset in hours, but should be rad. We are also told the green trim will revert back to their original slate gray.

UPDATE- Tri-S says that their machine will not work with Wide Mouth Mason jars. They do do Rogue, Stumptown, Gigantic Growlers. They say that the protruding top edge of the screw top and the raised lettering will not work on their equipment. FYI our quotes for simply making a mold of a wide mouth jar without “ball” or “